1861 and Lincoln on Slavery (week 2)

Last week's questions answered
Climate: 
North=relatively brief summers, long and cold winters. (imported goods-traded for timber, ships, good for fishing)
Middle=harbours for trading, climate was ok 'breadbasket' colonies (wheat)
South=well-suited for agriculture (tobacco, cotton, rice)

Columbian Trade Exchange: see next slide



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Slide 1: Tekstslide
EngelsBeroepsopleiding

In deze les zitten 34 slides, met interactieve quizzen, tekstslides en 3 videos.

time-iconLesduur is: 60 min

Onderdelen in deze les

Last week's questions answered
Climate: 
North=relatively brief summers, long and cold winters. (imported goods-traded for timber, ships, good for fishing)
Middle=harbours for trading, climate was ok 'breadbasket' colonies (wheat)
South=well-suited for agriculture (tobacco, cotton, rice)

Columbian Trade Exchange: see next slide



Slide 1 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Slide 2 - Tekstslide




Columbian Exchange
Recap week 1
The basics (details in Go West):
  • 1783, at the Treaty of Paris, Britain recognised the USA’s independence.
  • 1776 - declaration of independence = first 13 states admitted between 1787-1790
  • 1789 - George Washington president
  • Territorial expansion 1783–1853


Slide 3 - Tekstslide

Website shows territorial evolution of the U.S. A key element I failed to properly explain and link to civil war tensions last week!

Congress can, and has, set different conditions for statehood. Generally, these have included a minimum voting population, the compliance with various federal laws, and finally—once permitted—the ratification of a state constitution.

Slide 4 - Video

0:18-1:37
Interactive map
With territorial expansion came statehood: interactive map

Congress can, and has, set different conditions for statehood. Generally, these have included a minimum voting population, the compliance with various federal laws, and finally—once permitted—the ratification of a state constitution.





Slide 5 - Tekstslide

Website shows territorial evolution of the U.S. A key element I failed to properly explain and link to civil war tensions last week!

https://www.visualcapitalist.com/us-territorial-expansion/

https://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/US/US09-01.html
Review last week: to read up on
  • Missouri compromise (1820): 
In 1820, amid growing sectional tensions over the issue of slavery, the U.S. Congress passed a law that admitted Missouri to the Union as a slave state and Maine as a free state, while banning slavery from the remaining Louisiana Purchase lands located north of the 36º 30’ parallel. ->attempt to keep the balance in congress.

  • Compromise of 1850 (Pearce Act)
It admitted California as a free state, left Utah and New Mexico to decide for themselves whether to be a slave state or a free state, defined a new Texas-New Mexico boundary, and made it easier for slaveowners to recover runways under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850
->Purpose was to maintain a balance between free and slave states and to satisfy both the proslavery and antislavery force.

Slide 6 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Review last week: to read up on
  • Kansas-Nebraska act (1854)
 A political 'deal' between the (free) northern and (slave) southern states
 Missouri would join the United States as a slave state.
 Maine would become a free state, independent of Massachusetts
 In the future, north to the 36 ° latitude (the southern border of the state of Missouri) would become free states.

Link to Britannica.com with description of the act to add to your understanding.


Slide 7 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Review last week: to read up on
  •  Compromise of 1850 (Pearce Act)

It admitted California as a free state, left Utah and New Mexico to decide for themselves whether to be a slave state or a free state, defined a new Texas-New Mexico boundary, and made it easier for slaveowners to recover runways under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850->Purpose was to maintain a balance between free and slave states and to satisfy both pro and anti slavery force

Slide 8 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Were slaves that escaped to a free state really free? Why (not?)

Slide 9 - Woordweb

1850-1857 https://www.britannica.com/event/Dred-Scott-decision

1850: https://www.britannica.com/event/Fugitive-Slave-Acts

Slide 10 - Tekstslide

By 1850, of the 3.2 million enslaved people in the country’s fifteen slave states, 1.8 million were producing cotton. By 1860, slave labor was producing over two billion pounds of cotton per year. Indeed, American cotton soon made up two-thirds of the global supply, and production continued to soar

Slide 11 - Tekstslide

Five of the largest expansion events in U.S. history.
Learning objective
You can understand and explain how secession was attempted to be curbed and whether or not Lincoln was a tyrant.
Success Criteria
Explain:
Lincoln's views on slavery
Secession
Emancipation Proclamation
13th Amendment
Mention:
Key players in the Civil War

Slide 12 - Tekstslide

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas
 In 1860 Abraham Lincoln was elected as president

The election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 was an immediate cause of secession of the first 7 Southern states (SC, MS, FL, AL, GA, LA, TX), which formed the Confederacy in February 1861

Election of 1860

Slide 13 - Tekstslide

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas

Slide 14 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Slide 15 - Video

Start -1:56 - 5:45 - 6:45
              Activity
timer
15:00

Slide 16 - Tekstslide

Time left: find more on why the constitution was proslavery (before the 13th amendment)
Choose the question that sparked
the most discussion/interesting
part and answer it.
timer
7:00

Slide 17 - Open vraag

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Slide 18 - Tekstslide

https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-05-02-0012-0057

The Federalist Papers are a collection of essays written in the 1780s in support of the proposed U.S. Constitution and the strong federal government it advocated

Slide 19 - Video

U


The first shot in the war was fired by South Carolina militias who conquered the federal Fort Sumter. 
Lincoln then called on volunteers to maintain the Union.
The Civil War erupts 1861

Slide 20 - Tekstslide

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas
Who won the battle of Fort Sumter?
A
Union
B
Confederacy

Slide 21 - Quizvraag

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Introduction to the people in the Civil War - Pick 2 and find out what role they played in the civil war
  • Jefferson Davis
  • Ulysses S. Grant
  • Robert E. Lee
  • General Sherman
  • General Nathan Bedford Forrest
  • Stonewall Jackson
  • Beauregard and Anderson will be important later
Idea: Create a mind map of these people in your group/by yourself and add to it the events this person featured in.


timer
15:00

Slide 22 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Jefferson Davis
  • Senator from Mississipi
  • President of the CSA
  • Blamed by Southerners for loss......find out why later in this course

Slide 23 - Tekstslide

Acclaimed/accomplished family
Unionists: all Americans had forged the Union; any one part could not break away. Secession process is not in the constitution.
Ulysses S. Grant
  • The "fighting" general Lincoln wanted
  • Alcoholic, cigar smoker
  • "Four o'clock-in-the-morning courage"
  • Obscure family
  • Illinois
  • Later president of the U.S.

Slide 24 - Tekstslide

As an American hero, Grant was later elected the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877), working to implement Congressional Reconstruction and to remove the vestiges of slavery. (whitehouse.gov)

https://www.nps.gov/articles/family-or-country-grant-s-difficult-decision-senior-ranger-activity.htm

General Sherman
  • "War is hell"
  • Total warfare- precursor to modern warfare?
  • Destruction of civilian property
  • Burning of Atlanta - March to the Sea
  • Sherman's bow ties
  • War against civilians

Slide 25 - Tekstslide

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Stonewall Jackson
Hard start in life, grew up with relatives
1842 West Point military academy
Knew Robert E. Lee
First battle of Bull run (manassas)



Slide 26 - Tekstslide

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Slide 27 - Tekstslide

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Slide 28 - Tekstslide

Nathan Bedford Forrest was a Confederate cavalry commander during the American Civil War. He and his troops were responsible for the massacre of Black Union troops stationed at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, in April 1864, and he was the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan

Slide 29 - Link

Who is who? Will help understand the major battles and people in it that took place + the sides they were on.
Is there anything from week 1/this week that you'd like more information on/don't understand?

Slide 30 - Woordweb

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Topics to study and explain after week 1
  • The pre-civil war era (North vs South)

Slide 31 - Tekstslide

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Who were in the Civil War? (you'll learn more aobout them as the course progresses)
    Abraham Lincoln
    Jefferson Davis
    Ulysses S. Grant
    Robert E. Lee
    General George B. McClellan
    Stonewall Jackson
    General Sherman
    General Nathan Bedford Forrest (2021 article!)
    John Wilkes Booth

Slide 32 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Something to ponder on for next week....

How do you think the south managed their plantations after the civil war?

Slide 33 - Tekstslide

You'll learn more about this in the Modern Times course, but here's a snippet:

By hiring people for wages or by sharecropping with the small farmers, giving a large share of the harvest to the land owners.

Slide 34 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies