Frankenstein Volume 2

      Volume II
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In deze les zitten 35 slides, met tekstslides.

time-iconLesduur is: 60 min

Onderdelen in deze les

      Volume II

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mental state
What is Frankenstein's current mental state like? 

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shunned: persistently avoided, ignored, or rejected
complacency: a feeling of smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one's achievements
p. 94

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Mutability by Percy Shelley

We rest; a dream has power to poison sleep.
We rise; one wand’ring thought pollutes the day.
We feel, conceive, or reason; laugh or weep,
Embrace fond woe, or cast our cares away;
It is the same: for, be it joy or sorrow,
The path of its departure still is free.
Man’s yesterday may ne’er be like his morrow;
Nought may endure but mutability! 
Read the paragraph preceding the extract from the poem Mutability written by P. Shelly (chapter 2, volume II). Why did Mary Shelley include this extract in her noel? What is its meaning? 
Start reading from 'Alas! why does man boast ... .'

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Mutability in Frankenstein
The inclusion of the poem crystalizes her view of the nature of humanity, that is, what it means to be human and the role emotions play in defining ourselves. The paragraph preceding the poem is key to understanding the circumstances Shelley is using Mutability to describe. “Alas! Why does man boast sensibilities superior to those apparent in the brute; it only renders them more necessary beings…. We are moved by every wind that blows, and a chance word or scene that the world may convey to us.” Victor, and Shelley for that matter, is bringing up the argument that although man considers himself superior to nature and the world he lives in (the creature), the inherent “human” traits that supposedly make us superior give us problems that are unknown to other earthly inhabitants. These traits are our emotions, and according to the passage, have the power to “poison our sleep” or “pollute the day,” meaning a single thought can change our demeanor or demoralize us. “We feel, conceive, or reason; laugh or weep.” We have the ability to be sad, joyful, or anything in between, but when it comes down to it, we have no control over these sensibilities that we think make us so much better, and this leads to our “human” problems in life.

Shelley believes that “if our impulses were confined to hunger, thirst, and desire, we might nearly be freed…” That is, our emotions, whether they are love, hate, sadness or joy, imprison us. We act out in the confines of these feelings, and our actions all represent some kind of emotional response, but, as Shelley shares, an animal acts out of impulse, or instinct, alone.
https://mfalcon2.wordpress.com/2011/10/21/mutability-in-frankenstein/ 

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Volume II chapter 2
In reaching out to Victor Frankenstein, the creature alludes to Milton’s epic Paradise Lost: 'Remember that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed.' 

What are the similarities between Adam and Frankenstein’s creation? What are the differences? What does it tell you about the creature’s personality that he holds himself to human  standards? 
p 103

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docile: ready to accept control or instruction; submissive; obedient
trample: walk over

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docile: obedient; ready to accept control or instruction; submissive.

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Volume II chapter 2
Nature vs. Nurture is an important theme throughout Frankenstein. We begin to see it in this chapter when the creature speaks to Victor. When the creature says, '…I was benevolent; my soul glowed with love and humanity…,' we are alerted to a change in his character. He was something before and now he is different— no longer benevolent.  (p. 103 - 104 end of chapter)
How does this change reflect nature vs. nurture? 
 

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    What and how does creature learn?

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What and how does creature learn?

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What and how does creature learn?

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What and how does creature learn? 

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 What and how does creature learn? 

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What does creature learn while reading:
Goethe's Sorrows of Werter, Plutarch's Lives, Milton's Pradise Lost, Frankenstein's Journal?

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disquisition: essay; a long text

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Solon was an Athenian statesman, constitutional lawmaker and poet. He is remembered particularly for his efforts to legislate against political, economic and moral decline in Archaic Athens. His reforms failed in the short term, yet Solon is credited with having laid the foundations for Athenian democracy. 
Numa Pompilius  was the legendary second king of Rome, succeeding Romulus after a one-year interregnum.
Lycurgus:  9th century bc, Spartan lawgiver. He is traditionally regarded as the founder of the Spartan constitution, military institutions, and educational system.
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Although Theseus and Romulus were both statesmen by nature, neither maintained to the end the true character of a king, but both deviated from it and underwent a change, the former in the direction of democracy, the latter in the direction of tyranny, making thus the same mistake through opposite p193 affections.

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