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Low Carbon World Webinar

LOW-CARBON WORLD
Infrastructure related mobilities
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Slide 1: Tekstslide
MentorlesWOStudiejaar 6

In deze les zitten 28 slides, met interactieve quizzen, tekstslides en 3 videos.

Onderdelen in deze les

LOW-CARBON WORLD
Infrastructure related mobilities

Slide 1 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Slide 2 - Video

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Slide 3 - Tekstslide

The amount of carbon dioxide humans are responsible for generating worldwide each day fell by 17 percent this April compared to the daily average for 2019. The steep drop is a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to estimates published today in the journal Nature Climate Change. That gets the world to about the same amount of planet-heating pollution it was pumping out in 2006, showing how much greenhouse gas emissions have grown in just the last 14 years.

Most of the cuts in CO2 came from manufacturing, power generation, and transportation and shipping — excluding aviation. The aviation industry has been particularly hard hit by the pandemic. 

Slide 4 - Tekstslide

In the post-COVID, low-carbon/green economy world the biggest change can be seen in people’s mindset. That is, unnecessary mobilities are no longer the norm, but rather the exception. For example, people in this new era only use their private car as a last resort. Instead, they choose to use public transport, carpool, use electric bikes, walk et cetera. 

Furthermore, the post-COVID world entails having fewer (if possible, even no) business trips to faraway places in order to decrease the emission of CO 2 .  

people seemed to wake up to countless images of a quiet, clear sky and world around them. an immense contradiction to the world they have been used to. 


Slide 5 - Tekstslide

Scientists and environmentalists, however, aren’t exactly optimistic about the drop in greenhouse gas emissions. The dramatic fall is the result of governments temporarily shutting down businesses and people staying home to avoid spreading the novel coronavirus. But that alone isn’t enough to pump the brakes on climate change. Without more systemic and long-lasting changes to how society operates, pollution could come back with a vengeance once the pandemic subsides.
“Social responses alone, as shown here, would not drive the deep and sustained reductions needed,” the study reads, noting that any benefits the environment is experiencing because of the COVID-19 crisis are probably temporary. 
The start and continuation of two challenges

Slide 6 - Tekstslide

The start of a new global challenge
10 years ago, one of the largest challenges hit our planet. It gave itself the name COVID-19. Whereas the nature of the challenge was one of health, it couldn’t be ignored that this challenge had grave consequences for life in, for example, social, political, economic and geographic terms. The same consequences could be seen for another challenge, named climate change. In both cases it was we, humans, who created both challenges. And only we could become the solution.

The COVID-19 pandemic
Since the COVID-19 outbreak at the end of 2019 and the beginning of 2020, global leaders at first turned inwards, trying to bring stability to their own countries. Each country was dependent on its own experts and capability of their leaders. Some decided to have very strict lock-downs, whereas others decided for softer lock-downs or to act as if the pandemic was not real. The attitude of pretending the pandemic did not exist soon became counterproductive, as infection rates increased. World leaders had to acknowledge that the threat of COVID was very much real. Another lesson that COVID brought, was that a same size fits all policy was doomed to fail in countries that differed very much from each other. Thus, leaders had to come up with strategies and policies that both worked towards solving the problem, while also taking into account its citizens. 
Why and how to address climate change?

Slide 7 - Tekstslide

For now, let’s get back to one of the most prominent moments in our fight against climate change, since this challenge is very much linked to our low-carbon world. 
In 2015 world leaders came together to discuss why it matters and how to address climate change. The result of their meeting was the Paris Agreement which is a ‘legally binding international treaty on climate change’ signed by 196 parties that wish to meet the objective of limiting global warming if possible to 1.5 degrees Celsius, but at least below 2 degrees. The methodology towards realising this were twofold. On the one hand, countries were to draft so-called national determined contributions (NDCs) by 2020. These contributions were aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, long-term strategies, also known as long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies (LT-LEDS), were formulated to help achieve this goal. So far, the Paris Agreement has led to an increase in zero-carbon/low-carbon solutions and carbon neutrality targets (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change [UNFCCC], 2021). 
Lessons learnt
  • Global response
  • Global responsibility
  • Global cooperation

Slide 8 - Tekstslide

There are three major take-aways from the COVID-19 pandemic. The first was a global response. As a pandemic that did not care for borders and took advantage of the global mobilities among countries all over the world, a global response was needed. In this sense, it didn’t necessarily mean that we suddenly worked together. But each country was expected to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, one way or another. At one point in time, once vaccinations were made, a global response transitioned to global responsibility and cooperation. At first, many powerful countries were able to import the vaccinations and therefore vaccinate its citizens. It soon became apparent that some countries tended to lag behind since they did not always have the capacity to afford the vaccinations or had the means to properly inform its citizens on it. Although it took some years, at one point in time countries all around the world realised that the COVID-19 pandemic was not a challenge that they could individually tackle. There was a need for global responsibility and cooperation. These three take-aways from the COVID-pandemic (global response, responsibility, cooperation), also applied to and were integrated in the battle against climate change ever since. 
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Slide 9 - Video

The following video introduces the low-carbon world. Thereupon, we will shortly introduce what is the largest transition in our post-COVID/low-carbon world.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ0AwN41ClI
"The world favors short-term investments" Why do you think that is the case? And how would you deal with this if you were a country's leader?

Slide 10 - Open vraag

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

A changed mindset


What are your thoughts on a changed mindset?
Is it feasible for the entire world?

Slide 11 - Tekstslide

In our post-COVID, low-carbon world the biggest change can be seen in people’s mindset. That is, unnecessary mobilities are no longer the norm, but rather the exception. For example, people in this new era only use their private car as a last resort. Instead, they choose to use public transport, carpool, use electric bikes, walk et cetera. Furthermore, the post-COVID world entails having fewer (if possible, even no) business trips to faraway places in order to decrease the emission of CO2 . Finally, governments around the world make the low-carbon lifestyle an attractive and easy-to-apply mindset and lifestyle. 

Slide 12 - Video

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

2030: Low Carbon World

Slide 13 - Tekstslide

A low-carbon economy, low-fossil fuel economy or decarbonised economy is based on law-carbon power sources and consequently has a minimal output of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. 

how would that happen?


Mobility infrastructure

Slide 14 - Tekstslide

A low-carbon economy, low-fossil fuel economy or decarbonised economy is based on law-carbon power sources and consequently has a minimal output of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. 

how would that happen?


Mobility infrastructure
  • Economic & environmental benefits
  • Measures to reduce emissions

  1. mindset
  2. energy efficiency
  3. tax petroleum and air travel
  4. subsidise sustainable public transport.

  • Win-win situation

Slide 15 - Tekstslide

A low-carbon economy, low-fossil fuel economy or decarbonised economy is based on law-carbon power sources and consequently has a minimal output of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. 

how would that happen?


Covid19 & infrastructure
  • COVID19: increased unemployment & neglect infrastructure
  • Digitalisation
  • Can't delay climate action for economic growth

Slide 16 - Tekstslide

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated the underfunding of infrastructure globally that has been accumulating for decades. The pandemic has increased unemployment and has widely disrupted the economy. This has serious impacts on households, businesses, and federal, state and local governments. This is especially detrimental to infrastructure because it is so dependent on funding from government agencies--with state and local governments accounting for approximately 75% of spending on public infrastructure in the United States.[32] Governments are facing enormous decreases in revenue, economic downturns, overworked health systems, and hesitant workforces, resulting in huge budget deficits across the board. Another factor to consider is that a big portion of the infrastructure systems are also supported by user-generated revenue streams. Along with the onset of the pandemic and lockdowns, commercial water use has decreased, less commuters are on the roads and using public transportation, and airports have become almost entirely empty.
LOW CARBON INFRASTRUCTURE AFTER COVID19:
Information and communication technologies have been on the frontlines of the COVID-19 response. The crisis has accelerated the digitalization of many businesses and services, including teleworking and video conferencing systems in and out of the workplace, as well as access to healthcare, education and essential goods and services. 
As the pandemic reshapes the way in which we work, keep in touch, go to school and shop for essentials, it has never been more important to bridge the digital divide for the 3.6 billion people who remain offline, unable to access online education, employment or critical health and sanitation advice. The 2020 Financing for Sustainable Development Report provides policy options to harness the potential of digital technologies. 
Once the acute phase of the COVID-19 crisis is over, governments will need investments in infrastructure more than ever to accelerate economic recovery, create jobs, reduce poverty, and stimulate productive investment.
Question: What infrastructure-related mobilities are involved in activities that you like to do for fun (think about holidays, what transport you use, etc)?

Slide 17 - Open vraag

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Our three proposals for the low-carbon world

Slide 18 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Leisure-related
Infrastructure
Up to 1000km of traffic jams

More fuel consumption

Higher carbon emissions

Slide 19 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Bike du Soleil
Relieve leisure-related traffic

Provides a green alternative

Reignites interest in short-distance trips

Slide 20 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Bike du Soleil+
On route campsites

Support for tricky hills

Meet new friends along the way

Slide 21 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

On-Demand AutoCar
Less cars privately owned and more public use of cars
Solar powered charging 


Slide 22 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

On-Demand AutoCar
Order car on your phone

Car will arrive at location

Enter car with personalized code

Slide 23 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Shared vehicles for
multiple travellers 

Slide 24 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

On-Demand AutoCar
Smart operational system 

Optimal traffic flow

High availability matched to area demand

Slide 25 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

World-Wide Transport Web
Encourage use of public transport globally

Easy to travel sustainably across borders

Use for any type of transport (e.g. trains, bikes, busses)


Slide 26 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

World-Wide Transport Web+
Public transport to change 

This would be enabled by more infrastructure cooperation between countries;

More infrastructure developed in countries without widespread public transport systems.

Slide 27 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies

Conclusion

  • Changed mindset
  • Closer to home mobilities
  • Three sustainable initatives
  • Link with SDGs

Slide 28 - Tekstslide

Deze slide heeft geen instructies