Case Study - Operation Jairo (Primary)

SEA SHEPHERD CASE STUDY
OPERATION JAIRO
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Slide 1: Slide
ScienceGeography+44-6 Grade6th,7th Grade

This lesson contains 18 slides, with interactive quizzes, text slides and 7 videos.

time-iconLesson duration is: 20 min

Introduction

This Case Study connects with our Lesson Plans: Sea Turtle Poaching. It focuses on our working to stop poaching of sea turtles in Mayotte.

Instructions

This Case Study connects with our Lesson Plan: Sea Turtle Poaching.   It focuses on our campaign Operation Jairo working in a number of countries to protect sea turtles.  

This Case Study takes 20 minutes to complete.

Contact: education@seashepherdglobal.org
© Sea Shepherd 2021

Items in this lesson

SEA SHEPHERD CASE STUDY
OPERATION JAIRO

Slide 1 - Slide

This lesson is provided by Sea Shepherd.  Sea Shepherd was founded in 1977 and is a marine conservation organisation working to protect the oceans and marine wildlife.  Sea Shepherd works globally on a range of issues impacting the oceans, running numerous direct action campaigns each year.  IUU is one area Sea Shepherd is working on to help stop illegal fishing.
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Watch  the video

Slide 2 - Slide

During the lesson we will use these icons to identify the learning actions.

Slide 3 - Video

In 2014 Operation Jairo commenced with patrols on beaches in Costa Rica.
The campaign is named after Jairo Mora Sandoval who was killed by poachers on the beaches of Costa Rica while protecting nesting sea turtles. He was a young Costa Rican environmentalist working with volunteers from around the world to protect the beaches.
Show this video (1.05min), which briefly explains why Operation Jairo commenced.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K4lhfxzrM8&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=20

Protecting sea turtles in Costa Rica
Protecting sea turtles in Costa Rica

Slide 4 - Slide

Costa Rica
Patrolling on the island of Pacuare and Moin Beach on the mainland of Costa Rica. On many nights Sea Shepherd crew stood their ground, coming between poachers and nesting turtles. Protecting the turtle and her eggs from the poachers.

Despite being attacked by poachers crews saved nesting leatherback turtles.
Despite being attacked by poachers crews saved nesting leatherback turtles.

Slide 5 - Slide

Standing up to poachers
Protecting turtles is dangerous, on one night patrol eleven members of Sea Shepherd crew were violently assaulted by armed poachers. Although the poachers mainly used tree branches during the attack, they were also armed with handguns and fired at Sea Shepherd’s security guards.

Sea Shepherd remained undeterred in our mission. Less than a month later, just a few feet from where they had been attacked, our crew protected a nesting leatherback turtle from poachers and ensured that her 63 eggs were taken to a hatchery.

Slide 6 - Video

Helping hatchlings
For the final four weeks of the campaign, the crew relocated to Limon on the mainland to patrol Moin Beach. Many poachers profit from stealing turtles and their eggs from this beach.  3,000 nests and turtles were saved from poachers in Costa Rica during this campaign.

Show this video (1.07 min), which shows the crew helping sea turtle hatchlings
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfJCxkCIWq0&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=18

Working to protect sea turtles in Honduras
Working to protect sea turtles in Honduras.

Slide 7 - Slide

Honduras
In Honduras, Sea Shepherd patrolled the beaches of Utila each night for 74 nights, our crew protected 32 nests, saving a total of 3,636 turtles!  

No nests were raided by poachers while Sea Shepherd was on the scene.

Sea Shepherd worked alongside the Honduran Navy Bay Island Conservation Association, accompanying volunteers on patrols, ensuring the safety of the Sea Shepherd crew, as well as that of the turtles who use the shores of Honduras for safe nesting.

Slide 8 - Video

Florida (USA)
In Florida Sea Shepherd worked with Sea Turtle Oversight Protection to protect nesting females coming ashore.
In Florida the hatchlings aren’t threatened by poachers, as in other countries, but here they have the hazard of industrial lighting from local areas that disorients them. Making it difficult for them to find their way into the ocean. Upon hatching, sea turtles are normally guided toward the open ocean by the moonlight.

Artificial light causes them to head inland and away from the sea where they face dehydration on the beach or being crushed by vehicles on busy roadways.
Sea Shepherd crew helped guide the hatchlings on their way and documented disorientation events and any stranding or rescue of sick or injured turtles.

Sea Shepherd crews monitored hundreds of nests and observed more than 5,000 newly hatched turtles, with the majority disorienting, which were rescued and released safely to the sea!

Show this video (1.27 min), which shows the issue with lighting along the foreshore.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu7OmXGqw-w&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=16

Slide 9 - Video

Caribbean – Day patrol identifying nests
In 2018 Operation Jairo was expanded to include the Caribbean and to Nicaragua, where turtles are also under threat from poachers.

Show this video (1.33min) which shows a day patrol in the Caribbean and how to identify nests.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqqddYwyYto&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=6

Slide 10 - Video

Caribbean night patrol
Show this video (1.44min), which shows a night patrol in the Caribbean.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfCx1OZXSSY&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=7

Slide 11 - Video

Caribbean – leatherback hatchlings
Show this video (1.58min), which shows leatherback turtle hatchlings in the Caribbean.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLzZPhEmOZQ&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=8

Protecting sea turtles in Nicaragua is dangerous, but necessary to save species.
Protecting sea turtles in Nicaragua is dangerous, but necessary to save species.

Slide 12 - Slide

Nicaragua
In 2018-2019, Sea Shepherd went to Central America to protect sea turtle eggs, hatchlings, and nesting mothers.

Our crew patrolled for 84 nights along the beaches of Padre Ramos, Nicaragua, which is home to nesting sites for Pacific Hawksbill, Olive Ridley, Green, and occasionally Leatherback sea turtles.

In Nicaragua, it is illegal to kill sea turtles and poach their eggs, but unfortunately, the country’s government does not have the necessary resources to stop the poaching completely. In areas such as Padre Ramos, there is no oversight, leaving the sea turtles completely unprotected.

Our crew was outnumbered twenty to one, as dozens of armed poachers hunted for nesting mothers each night. The crew identified poachers, protected nesting mothers, and brought eggs to a hatchery to incubate. This allowed the baby sea turtles to be safely born and then returned to the ocean.

Slide 13 - Video

Nicaragua
Despite multiple attacks from poachers, the crew spent three months on the ground in Nicaragua. They found over 40 nests and saved over 3,900 eggs, giving these baby sea turtles a fighting chance at survival.

Show this video (2.07min), which shows Sea Shepherd crew protecting sea turtles.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7FJEgPnrJs&list=PLNmnNu36NAjhYQH35oj2oR5WdoUQcr1H8&index=2



In which countries does Operation Jairo operate in?

Slide 14 - Open question

Ask students to complete their answers to the following question using the www.LessonUp.app or discuss in classroom.

“In which countries does Operation Jairo operate in to protect Sea Turtles?”



What threatens sea turtle hatchlings in Florida?

Slide 15 - Open question

Ask students to complete their answers to the following question using the www.LessonUp.app or discuss in classroom.

“What threatens sea turtle hatchlings in Florida?”



Write down three things you have learned?

Slide 16 - Open question

What did you learn?
Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“Write down three things you have learned?”



Write down one thing you didn't understand?

Slide 17 - Open question

What don’t you understand?
Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“Write down one thing you didn’t understand?”

www.seashepherdglobal.org

Slide 18 - Slide

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