Shark Poaching (Secondary)

SHARK POACHING
1 / 29
next
Slide 1: Slide
Social StudiesHistory+47-9 Grade9-11 Grade

This lesson contains 29 slides, with interactive quizzes, text slides and 1 video.

time-iconLesson duration is: 45 min

Introduction

Overfishing is emptying the ocean, with 90% of fisheries already overfished. Illegal fishing is having a big impact. This lesson focuses on the shark poaching aspect of illegal fishing.

Instructions

In this lesson we explain the impact overfishing is having on sharks and why this is occurring.

Time: 45 minutes

Contact: education@seashepherdglobal.org
© Sea Shepherd 2021

Items in this lesson

SHARK POACHING

Slide 1 - Slide

This lesson is provided by Sea Shepherd.  Sea Shepherd was founded in 1977 and is a marine conservation organisation working to protect the oceans and marine wildlife.  Sea Shepherd works globally on a range of issues impacting the oceans, running numerous direct action campaigns each year.  Shark poaching is one area Sea Shepherd is working on to help stop illegal fishing and reduce by-catch.
What you already know...
You are going to learn...
Action required!

Evaluate your knowledge

Click on the image

Watch  the video

Slide 2 - Slide

During the lesson we will use these icons to identify the learning actions.
Impacts of overfishing on sharks.
Impacts of overfishing on sharks.

Slide 3 - Slide

In this lesson we explain the impact overfishing is having on sharks and why this is occurring.

INTERACTIVE JOIN – ask students to go to www.LessonUp.app

What do you already
know about shark poaching?

Slide 4 - Mind map

Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“What do you already know about shark poaching?”

Slide 5 - Video

Empty ocean by 2050
Scientists estimate that by 2050 the ocean ecosystem will be on the verge of collapse, empty of fish and marine wildlife, unless urgent action is taken on the issues impacting on the oceans and marine wildlife.

Show this video (2.53min), which explains how important all species are to our planet.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLcA31VRlRU

Discuss the video with the class and what it means.

Over 100 million tonnes fish caught each year.
Over 100 million tonnes fish caught each year.

Slide 6 - Slide

Sharks
One of the reasons for this is overfishing of the ocean. It is estimated that over 100 million tons of fish is caught each year. Fish is the largest traded commodity in the world.

UN estimates 90% of fish species overfished.
Two-thirds fully exploited
26% over exploited
10% healthy fisheries
UN estimates 90% of fish species overfished.

Slide 7 - Slide

Demand for fish
Overfishing is a result of the growing demand for seafood as our global population rapidly increases.

This slide shows how much of the ocean has already been overfished.  

The United Nations believes two-thirds of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited and 26% are over-exploited, which means that only 10% of our planet's fisheries are healthy.

Over 100 million sharks caught annually.
Over 100 million sharks killed each year.

Slide 8 - Slide

Over 100 million sharks killed each year
One species that has been heavily targeted is sharks, with over 100 million killed each year.

Sharks have lived on planet earth for 450 million years.
400 known shark species.

Sharks have lived on planet earth for 450 million years.
400 known shark species.

Slide 9 - Slide

Over 400 shark species
Sharks have been on this planet for over 450 million years, before the dinosaurs.  

There are currently over 400 species of sharks that have been identified.

Ask students which shark species they can name?


What would be the impacts of removing sharks from the ocean eco-system?

Slide 10 - Open question

Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“What do you think the impacts might be of removing sharks from the ocean ecosystem?”

A healthy ocean needs sharks.
A healthy ocean needs sharks.

Slide 11 - Slide

Health oceans need sharks
Sharks are a very important part of the ocean, they help to keep the ecosystem in balance.  

They can be lazy hunters and will take an easy meal, such as scavenging the seabed eating the remains of dead sea-life.  Effectively cleaning up the ocean floor.  They also eat the old, sick and weak members of the species they prey on, which helps make that species population healthier.

Balancing ecosystems.
Balancing ecosystems.

Slide 12 - Slide

Balancing ecosystems
Sharks help to maintain a balance and control smaller predators.

In areas where shark numbers have been reduced, particularly around coral reef systems, it has had a negative impact on the whole system, other fish species have gotten out of control and killed off many small species of fish.

Those smaller species are often the ones that help keep corals healthy.

Where sharks have been allowed to recover to healthy numbers the reef systems flourish with hundreds of different species living in a healthy ecosystem.

400 known shark species.
Only 47 species have healthy populations.
400 known shark species.
Only 47 species have healthy populations.

Slide 13 - Slide

Endangered species
Many shark species are now engendered. Of the over 400 shark species:
➢    143 shark species are endangered.
➢    210 data deficient, so we can’t determine how severely they have been overfished.
➢    The remaining species have healthy populations.
What do you think are the
main reasons why sharks are
targeted by poachers?

Slide 14 - Mind map

Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“What do you think are the main reasons sharks are targeted by poachers?”

Shark finning.
Shark finning.

Slide 15 - Slide

Shark finning
The biggest reason we kill sharks is for their fins.

Most of the shark is not used for food, the fishermen just cut the fins off the shark and then throw the shark back into the ocean alive, to drown.  

Fins are used for herbal remedies and Shark Fin Soup.

Shark Fin Soup has no health benefits or real taste, but it is a sign of wealth in some Asian cultures and therefore people pay a lot of money for it. This is the main cause of demand for shark fins globally.

Shark liver oil.
Shark liver oil.

Slide 16 - Slide

Shark liver oil
Other than for their fins sharks are killed to extract the oil from their liver. It has been used for many years as a folk remedy for healing wounds and many other ailments, including cancer.

The benefits and side effects of this have not been scientifically tested.  People used to believe that sharks don’t get cancer, so they must have an immunity, thus they are used for remedies.

We now have evidence that sharks do in fact get cancers and tumours.

Shark meat.
Shark meat.

Slide 17 - Slide

Shark meat
Some sharks are caught for food, but most of them are thrown away.  If you go shopping for shark meat you will most like not read ‘shark’ on the label.  

Ask students:
“What names do you think shark meat is sold as?”

Shark meat - known by many names.
Shark meat - known by many names.

Slide 18 - Slide

Shark meat names
Shark meat is known by many different names around the world.

This image shows some of the names used around the world.


Why do you think that shark is
known by different names?

Slide 19 - Open question

Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“Why do you think that shark is known by different names?”

Some answers:
➢    Illegal trade is hiding the exact source of the shark.
➢    People don’t like idea of eating shark.
➢    With so many species it is easier to have a generic name.
➢    A fancy name sounds more valuable and raise the price.

How are 100 million sharks caught?
How are 100 million sharks caught?

Slide 20 - Slide

Shark catch
There are a number of ways that sharks are killed, some are intentional and others are just victims of the commercial fishing industry.

Poaching - using nets and longlines,
targeting fins and shark liver oil.
Poaching - using nets and longlines, targeting fins and shark liver oil.

Slide 21 - Slide

Poaching
Illegal fishing operations intentionally take sharks. These poachers are part of the illegal network, that supply shark fins and shark liver oil, contributing to the deaths of millions of sharks each year.  

They are caught using nets or long lines

The Sea Shepherd Case Study Operation Sola Stella provides additional information to enhance learning in this area.

By-catch in commercial fishing nets.
By-catch in commercial fishing nets.

Slide 22 - Slide

By-catch
Sharks are often caught as by-catch, which is basically anything that gets caught in the nets that the fishermen don’t want or cannot sell. It mostly gets thrown back into the oceans as rubbish, a waste of life effectively.  

This includes sharks who become trapped in fishing nets while chasing their food.

While they should be released often they are still finned before being dumped back into the ocean.

Entangled in nets
lost overboard by vessels.
Entangled in nets lost overboard by vessels.

Slide 23 - Slide

Entanglement in nets
Illegal gillnets used by poachers or fishing nets lost overboard from fishing vessels are also dangerous for sharks and other species. They become floating death traps.



How can we stop poaching?

  • Patrol for illegal poachers.
  • Ban shark fin products.
  • Create awareness about status of sharks.
  • Change attitudes about shark products and reduce demand.

Slide 24 - Slide

How we can stop poaching
➢    Patrol for illegal poachers – monitoring for illegal activity.
➢    Ban on shark fin products – legislate to protect sharks and the trade in shark products.
➢    Create awareness of the status of shark – protecting endangered species.
➢    Correct the misconception about benefits of shark products,
➢    Changing attitudes and the demand for shark fins.

How do you think you
can help protect sharks?

Slide 25 - Mind map

How do you think you can help protect sharks?
Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“How do you think you can help protect sharks?”

Some suggested answers:
➢    Do not buy shark products.
➢    Help raise awareness.
➢    Push for your government to ban shark fishing and the sales of shark fins.



Write down three things you have learned?

Slide 26 - Open question

What did you learn?
Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“Write down three things you have learned?”



Write down one thing you didn't understand?

Slide 27 - Open question

What don’t you understand?
Ask students to answer the following question using www.LessonUp.app or discuss in the classroom.  

“Write down one thing you didn’t understand?”

Slide 28 - Slide

Case studies
To enhance learning on this issue use some of the Sea Shepherd Case Studies on this topic, showing first hand accounts of what is happening to sharks and other species in our ocean.

www.seashepherdglobal.org

Slide 29 - Slide

This item has no instructions